Strategies for Teachers and Students to Improve Learning When It Comes to Hearing Loss

Hearing Health, Lifestyle
September 1, 2022
By
Live Better Hearing

Have you ever wondered if your hearing loss could be impacting your education? You’re not alone. Many students and teachers alike struggle with hearing loss and the impact it can have on their ability to learn and communicate effectively in the classroom. In fact, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), approximately 1.5 billion people worldwide have some degree of hearing loss.

In this blog post, we’ll explore how hearing loss can affect learning, provide strategies for teachers and students to improve communication in the classroom, and discuss the importance of seeking help from a hearing professional.

Where does pediatric hearing loss come from?

Child hearing loss can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetic and non-genetic factors. Here are some of the most common causes of hearing loss in children:

Genetic factors: Some types of hearing loss are hereditary and can be passed down from one or both parents. Congenital hearing loss, which is present at birth, can also be caused by genetic factors.

Infections: Certain infections, such as rubella, cytomegalovirus (CMV), and meningitis, can cause hearing loss in children.

Noise exposure: Prolonged exposure to loud noises, such as listening to music at high volumes or attending noisy events like concerts, can damage the delicate structures of the inner ear and cause hearing loss.

Ototoxic medications: Some medications, such as certain antibiotics, chemotherapy drugs, and diuretics, can damage the hair cells of the inner ear and cause hearing loss.

Birth complications: Premature birth, low birth weight, and complications during birth can increase the risk of hearing loss in children.

Head injury: Trauma to the head or ear can cause damage to the inner ear or auditory nerve and result in hearing loss.

The Impact of Hearing Loss on Education

Hearing loss can have a significant impact on a student’s ability to learn and communicate effectively in the classroom. Students with hearing loss may struggle to hear important information, such as instructions from their teachers, discussions among classmates, or the content of videos or other multimedia materials. This can lead to frustration, poor academic performance, and a lack of engagement with the learning material.

Furthermore, students with hearing loss may experience social isolation and feelings of exclusion from their peers, which can further impact their mental health and wellbeing. For these reasons, it’s important for both students and teachers to be aware of the impact of hearing loss on education and take steps to improve communication in the classroom.

Strategies for Teachers and Students to Improve Communication in the Classroom

There are several strategies that teachers and students can use to improve communication in the classroom, even with hearing loss. These strategies include:

Use visual aids: Visual aids, such as PowerPoint slides or written instructions, can help students with hearing loss better understand important information.

Reduce background noise: Background noise can make it difficult for students with hearing loss to focus on the speaker’s voice. Teachers can reduce background noise by closing doors and windows, turning off fans or air conditioners, and minimizing the use of electronic devices.

Face the class: Teachers should face the class when speaking, rather than turning their back to write on the board. This can help students with hearing loss better lip-read and understand important information.

Speak clearly and slowly: Teachers should speak clearly and slowly, enunciating their words, and pausing between sentences. This can help students with hearing loss better understand what is being said.

Use assistive technology: Students with hearing loss can use assistive technology, such as hearing aids or personal FM systems, to better hear and understand important information in the classroom

Hearing loss can have a significant impact on a student’s ability to learn and communicate effectively in the classroom. However, there are strategies that teachers and students can use to improve communication, and seeking help from a hearing professional is crucial for effective treatment.

A hearing professional can conduct a hearing test to determine the degree of a child’s hearing loss and recommend the best course of treatment, which may include hearing aids or other assistive devices. 

We can recommend a hearing professional who specializes in pediatric hearing loss, like our caring audiologists in our Frederick hearing center or other clinics that specialize in pediatric hearing healthcare.

And if you are a teacher who suspects you have hearing loss yourself, don’t hesitate to contact our hearing practice today for a consultation.

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